University of Manitoba Faculty Association members remain committed to the future of public education, set strike deadline of November 2nd 

Winnipeg - The University of Manitoba Faculty Association (UMFA) continues to prioritize the future of public education in Manitoba and has set a bargaining deadline of October 31st and a strike deadline for November 2nd. UMFA continues to push for real action from the University administration to address issues of faculty retention and recruitment. This announcement comes 24 hours after the University of Manitoba Students Union (UMSU) voted to support UMFA in their fight to protect, defend, and enhance public education in Manitoba. 

“Our members are committed to the future of public education in Manitoba, and we are frustrated that after 5 years of wage freezes and government interference that the administration can’t recognize why we continue to struggle with issues of faculty retention,” said Orvie Dingwall, UMFA President. “We want the University of Manitoba to continue being a great university, but to do that requires investment in attracting and retaining the high-quality instructors, professors, and librarians who provide students with the support and opportunities they need.” 

While a strike deadline has been set and communicated to the University administration, UMFA continues to demand that President Michael Bennaroch act on his previous comments which recognize that faculty compensation continues to lag behind other leading institutions. That commitment to the future of students and faculty includes protecting the independence of the university from the provincial government, and to prohibit the government from continued interference in UMFA’s negotiations. 

“It’s incredibly disappointing that both the administration and the provincial government continue to put the short- and long-term future of students in jeopardy,” said Dingwall. “We know that students support UMFA in our fight to protect high-quality public education in Manitoba. We need an administration who prioritizes students and their learning conditions.”

UMFA represents over 1,200 professors, instructors, academic librarians, and archivists at the University of Manitoba. 

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COVID 19 UPDATE

UMFA's Advocacy Regarding the UM COVID Response: Update

Oct. 20, 2021 

Recently, UM administration denied all of UMFA’s detailed requests, issued in Spring 2021, for COVID-19 pandemic related relief, supports, and protections for you. In support of these requests, many of you clearly identified your needs and challenges in open letters to UM administration.  According to administration, the hardships of the pandemic were short-lived and have already been sufficiently and comprehensively addressed, for example, by the one-year extension to tenure and promotion timelines that was granted near the outset of the pandemic.  
 
Downplaying the impact of the pandemic has regrettably occurred in other recent interactions with UM administration. Over the past six weeks, a group of UMFA representatives have met on five occasions with senior UM administration to discuss the administration's current COVID-19 pandemic response and the 100% re-opening plan they have in place for January 2022. 
 
What We’ve Been Advocating
 
Your UMFA representatives have repeatedly conveyed the numerous and growing concerns you are bringing to our attention, including the following: 

  • The absence of accommodations for those whose needs and concerns fall outside the scope of human-rights protected characteristics. These include caregivers; those who may have immunocompromised, unvaccinated, or vulnerable individuals in their immediate circles; those who may be immunocompromised or vulnerable themselves; those who are required to self-isolate; and/or those who have received no information verifying the safety of their workplaces (e.g., percentages of students who are vaccinated, evidence of upgrades and measures to ensure building safety such as increased air exchanges, etc.). 
  • A lack of information about the UM’s Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems in campus buildings and whether these meet standards to prevent the transmission of COVID-19, and not simply minimum workplace standards that apply outside the context of a pandemic caused by an airborne virus whose Delta variant is even more easily transmitted. 
  • The absence of real-time procedures to verify the vaccination status of people on the Fort Garry Campus.
  • The absence of real-time procedures to verify a negative COVID-19 test result of those yet-unvaccinated people on the FGC  
  • A lack of criteria for pivoting to online instruction as necessary and appropriate in Winter 2022 term. 
  • The absence of a clear plan to deal with students and employees who opt not to be vaccinated. Of particular concern is administration’s decision not to verify the vaccine status of visitors to campus unless those visitors are seeking admission to a particular event.  

We have asked for concrete remedies to these, among other concerns. Thus far, we have been successful only in securing a meeting with representatives from Physical Plant in which it was verified that very few COVID-19-specific measures have been implemented regarding campus HVAC systems. We have learned that among the very limited COVID-19-specific steps taken, these largely depended on summer weather and the ability to maximize fresh air intake, which is now severely reduced with the onset of colder weather.  
 
Questions About Air Quality, L.A.S.H. Committees 
 
Representatives from Physical Plant also described that air quality (not air exchange) tests are being conducted only in selected older buildings, which means no information is available for many of the spaces in which you work. We have insisted that Local Area Safety and Health (LASH) committees should be meeting and trained on COVID-19-specific issues, and that the University-wide Safety and Health Committee (called OSHAC) should do the same, since these groups have not been meeting over the course of the pandemic. UMFA Representatives will be meeting with the University’s Environment Health and Safety Office next week to press this issue further.
 
UMFA recognizes the urgency of the situation and will continue to advocate for your safety, health, and well-being, and by extension, for a safe return to campus for all.  In the meantime, please share your immediate concerns related to the UM’s COVID-19 response, and your concerns related to the current January 2022 plan with a re-opening target of 100% by participating in an UMFA-organized focus group.  
 
Participate in an UMFA Focus Group!
 
We are conducting focus groups this week to document your concerns; if interested in participating please contact Grievance Officer Clea Schmidt at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Otherwise, we welcome hearing from you via e-mail at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The plan is to inform UM administration’s overall strategy and their announcement about the January term which is expected on November 1.   
 
Comments, Questions, or Concerns? Contact the Office – This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / 474.8272

Open letters: Members demand accommodation for dependent care!

Dear Dr. Benarroch, President and Vice-Chancellor University of Manitoba, Dr. Brian Postl, Dean, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences & Vice-Provost (Health Sciences), Dr. Netha Dyck, Dean, College of Nursing, and other members of our University of Manitoba Community, 

Schools in Winnipeg have shut down as of Wednesday, May 12th, 2021 and their reopening will be re-evaluated on May 30th, 2021, per the provincial government directive announced Sunday, May 9th. Ironically, this announcement came on Mother's day of all days. It is no secret that mothers have been disproportionately affected by the initial school closure and added home-life responsibilities in March of 2020 – especially those in academia1. Women are producing less research and publications2, are interrupted more when working at home3, and take on more of the housework and childcare duties, including providing emotional support to their families4. High levels of mental and physical stress are being reported by most academics5. The College of Nursing is a predominantly female faculty. Many of our faculty have young children who are again learning remotely from home, requiring our attention and support, while our responsibilities to teaching, research, and service continue uninterrupted.   

It is therefore an insult that in light of this announcement, the University of Manitoba is suggesting that “If you need to reduce your work hours during this time, options to do so include vacation, overtime banks, voluntary days off without pay, and other leaves outlined in collective agreements and university policies. You are encouraged to work out an individual plan with your supervisor.”(email from VP Admin, May 13, 2021) 

We propose a paid leave and stoppage or reduction of teaching, service, research, and academic duties until schools are safely back in session. This is not sick leave and it is certainly not appropriate to classify it as a vacation.   

We, as parents and full-time instructors, researchers, and valued members of the College of Nursing Rady Faculty of Health Sciences did not think twice back in March of 2020 when schools and many daycares shut down. There was no question of how or when the work would get done, it just did. The academic year was finished, spring and summer term was started all the while children were cared for and educated while being kept at home. This scenario has played out in varying degrees again this past academic year. We demand that we be respected for the unwavering commitment to delivering quality education. 

Given that we have been in this pandemic for over a year and many predicted the third wave hitting Manitoba for weeks if not months, perhaps RFHS has considered this possibility and has a proposed solution; we are open to hearing one.  Taking vacation or unpaid leave is not the option. The purpose of this letter is to clarify that the ‘status quo’ of working double-duty indefinitely will not be tolerated henceforth.   

Respectfully for your consideration, 

Alia Lagace, Genevieve Thompson & Sufia Turner, UMFA Representatives, College of Nursing

 

1 Langin, K. (2021). Pandemic hit academic mothers hard, data show. Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science)371(6530), 660–660. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.371.6530.660  

2Flaherty, C. (2020, April 20). No room of one's own: Early journal submission data suggest COVID‐19 is tanking women's research productivity. Inside Higher Ed.  https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/04/21/early‐journal‐submission‐data‐suggest‐covid‐19‐tanking‐womens‐research‐productivity 

3Crook, S. (2020). Parenting during the Covid-19 pandemic of 2020: academia, labour and care work. Women’s History Review, 29(7), 1226 - 1238.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09612025.2020.1807690

4Guy, B., & Arthur, B. (2020). Academic motherhood during COVID‐19: Navigating our dual roles as educators and mothers. Gender, Work, and Organization27(5), 887–899.   https://doi.org/10.1111/gwao.12493  

5VanLeeuwen, C., Veletsianos, G., Johnson, N., & Belikov, O. (2021). Never‐ending repetitiveness, sadness, loss, and “juggling with a blindfold on:” Lived experiences of Canadian college and university faculty members during the COVID‐19 pandemic. British Journal of Educational Technology. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13065  


 

May 31, 2021                                                                                                                       Sent via Email

To:

Dr. Michael Benarroch, President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Manitoba
Dr. Brian Postl, Dean, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and College of Medicine
Dr. Reg Urbanowski, Dean, College of Rehabilitation Sciences
Dr. Anastasia Kelekis-Cholakis, Dean, Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry
Dr. Lalitha Raman-Wilms, Dean, College of Pharmacy

Dear administrators,

As of May 12, 2021, all schools in Winnipeg were closed to help contain the latest surge of Covid-19. The school closure order is now in effect until June 7, and it is quite possible that the closure will extend beyond that, perhaps to the end of the school year later in June. This third wave of the pandemic is also causing the shutdown of increasing numbers of day programs and child daycares due to Covid-19 exposures.

This has put a tremendous strain on our faculty and staff members who are parents or guardians to young children whose immediate health and well-being solely depends on their caregiver. Caring for dependents as a result of the closing of schools and daycares is a 24/7 responsibility. These are children who are legally not able to be left alone, and who require considerable hands-on support to meet the new realities of remote learning. There are no breaks and there are currently no supports available for these parents/guardians. As a result, the ability of caregivers to perform functions related to their job with the University of Manitoba is severely stretched. They are essentially being asked to perform two full-time jobs simultaneously--for the second time during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The repercussions are felt throughout families, but women have taken the brunt of the impact to their careers. The added work of childcare has made already existing gender disparities in academic spaces larger.1 Research productivity since the beginning of the pandemic is lower in women than men,1 as women take on more of the load at home. Before the pandemic, women and men who were engaged in paid work at home were interrupted in their duties approximately with the same frequency. Now, with added childcare and housework, women are interrupted over 50% more often.2 Feelings of being overwhelmed, and of sadness and loss, were common in the early stages of the pandemic in academic faculty members.3 Imagine how people are feeling now, in month 15, and especially those with young children who are now at home.

The majority of faculty in the healthcare professions are women, and many are parents caring for young children. Those faculty with young children are often also early career faculty. Yet, even as home and family obligations expand because of the pandemic, teaching, research, and service responsibilities continue unchanged. There were and are no “extra” faculty or staff to whom work can be delegated. Moreover, all faculty and staff have been working beyond capacity throughout this pandemic, making it very difficult for parents/caregivers to feel they can ask colleagues to take on additional work.

It is with this context that we take issue with the recent insensitive message from Vice-President Administration Ms. Naomi Andrew, suggesting that “If you need to reduce your work hours during this time, options to do so include vacation, overtime banks, voluntary days off without pay, and other leaves outlined in collective agreements and university policies.” (email May 13, 2021) 

We support our nursing colleagues in proposing a paid leave and immediate stoppage or reduction of teaching, service, research, and academic duties until schools are safely back in session. The requirement to step away from work duties is not sick leave, and it is certainly not appropriate to classify it as a vacation.   

Over the past year, faculty and staff have stepped up, without hesitation, and worked twice as hard to ensure the quality of the programs we offer did not suffer, and our students received the very best experience we could provide. This included not only the first round of school closures in spring of 2020, but also the current 2021 school closures, when our professional programs were and are still in classes. At this point, with over a year of the pandemic behind us, we demand respect from University administration for the unprecedented work we have done to date, and acknowledgment of our unwavering commitment to the College, Faculty and University. Expressing thanks for our work is not enough.

The University has had 15 months to make plans and find solutions to the evolving challenges of the pandemic. Telling caregivers of dependent children to take vacation days or unpaid leave is not the solution. We stand with our colleagues in Nursing and state clearly that the ‘status quo’ of working double-duty for the foreseeable future is not acceptable.   

Respectfully for your consideration,

Joanne Parsons,
Katinka Stecina,
Kathy Yerex,
Alyson Mahar,
Benjamin Lindsey,
Sherif Eltonsy,
Sachin Katyal.

UMFA representatives on behalf of faculty from the following units:

College of Pharmacy
College of Rehabilitation Sciences
Department of Community Health Sciences
Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science
Department of Oral Biology
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Department of Physiology & Pathophysiology
School of Dental Hygiene

CC:
Dr. Sabine Hombach-Klonisch, Department Head, Human Anatomy and Cell Science
Dr. Sharon Bruce, Department Head, Community Health Sciences
Dr. Mark Garrett, Department Head, Physical Therapy
Dr. Leanne Leclair, Department Head, Occupational Therapy
Ms. Denise Mackey, Department Head, Respiratory Therapy
Dr. Paul Fernyhough, Department Head, Pharmacology & Therapeutics (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Mr. Michael Shaw, President, UMFA

 

1Langin, K. (2021). Pandemic hit academic mothers hard, data show. Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science), 371(6530), 660–660. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.371.6530.660  

2Abi Adams-Prassl, ‘The Gender Wage Gap on an Online Labour Market: The Cost of Interruptions’, cited in Alison Andrew et al. ‘The Gendered Division of Paid and Domestic Work under Lockdown’, IZA DP NO. 13500, July 2020, http://ftp.iza.org/dp13500.pdf.

3VanLeeuwen, C., Veletsianos, G., Johnson, N., & Belikov, O. (2021). Never‐ending repetitiveness, sadness, loss, and “juggling with a blindfold on:” Lived experiences of Canadian college and university faculty members during the COVID‐19 pandemic. British Journal of Educational Technology. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13065 


June 2, 2021

Dear Dr. Benarroch, President and Vice-Chancellor University of Manitoba, and Dr. Taylor, Dean, Faculty of Arts, University of Manitoba

CC: Arts Council Executive (Jila Ghomeshi, Jocelyn Thorpe, Stephan Jaeger, Bryan Peeler, Adam Murry, Royce Koop, Cary Miller, Launa Lebo-McGowan)

As of May 12th, 2021, all schools in Winnipeg were closed to help contain the latest surge of Covid-19. The school closure order is in effect until June 7 and likely may extend beyond that to the end of the school year. This third wave of the pandemic is also causing the shutdown of increasing numbers of day programs and child daycares due to Covid-19 exposures. Home care services for older adults are also being curtailed.

This shutdown of needed supports puts a tremendous strain on Arts faculty and staff who are parents or guardians to young children; who are carers of older adults; or who care for adults with disabilities or life-limiting conditions. This includes faculty and staff in the Department of Sociology and Criminology. These are 24/7 responsibilities. Children, for instance, are legally not able to be left alone and require considerable hands-on support in remote learning. There are no breaks and there are no supports available for parents/guardians/caregivers. As a result, the ability of caregivers to perform functions related to their job with the University of Manitoba is severely stretched. They are essentially being asked to perform two full-time jobs simultaneously—for the second time during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Repercussions are felt by families, but women have taken the brunt of the impact to their careers. Existing gender disparities in academic spaces are widening. Research productivity since the beginning of the pandemic is lower for women than men 1 as women take on more of the load at home. Before the pandemic, women and men who were engaged in paid work at home were interrupted in their duties approximately with the same frequency. Now, with added care responsibilities, women are interrupted over 50% more often.2

Faculty with young children in particular are often also early career faculty. Yet, even as home and family obligations expand because of the pandemic, teaching/supervision, research, and service responsibilities continue unchanged. There were and are no “extra” faculty or staff to whom work can be delegated. Moreover, all faculty and staff have been working beyond capacity throughout this pandemic, making it very difficult for parents/caregivers to feel they can ask colleagues to take on additional work.

Doing ‘double-duty’ not only means our careers and well-being suffer, but has real impacts on the children and family members we care for during a time in which our family members require more of us to help mitigate the myriad of impacts of the pandemic on their well-being.

As such, we take issue with the recent insensitive message from the University of Manitoba, suggesting that “If you need to reduce your work hours during this time, options to do so include vacation, overtime banks, voluntary days off without pay, and other leaves outlined in collective agreements and university policies.”(email from VP Admin, May 13, 2021)

We support our nursing colleagues in proposing a paid leave and immediate stoppage or reduction of work duties until schools are safely back in session. Importantly, the requirement to step away from work duties is not sick leave, and it is certainly not appropriate to classify it as a vacation.

Over the past year, faculty and staff of the Faculty of Arts have stepped up, without hesitation, and worked twice as hard to ensure the quality of the programs we offer did not suffer and our students received the very best experience we could provide. This included the first round of school closures in spring of 2020, when Winter term courses were still in session. At this point, with over a year of the pandemic behind us, we demand respect from University administration for the unprecedented work we have done to date and acknowledgment of our unwavering commitment to the Faculty and University. Expressing thanks for our work or telling us that counselling supports are
available is not enough.

Moreover, when UMFA was bargaining with the employer last year for financial compensation for members who had to hire alternative sources of care, UofM administration even refused to acknowledge that care for dependents during Covid-related lockdowns was a problem for faculty, instead telling us that Covid-19 was bolstering the productivity of many members. Administration’s disregard at that time of the effects of school, daycare and home care/day program shutdowns, coupled with lack of access to the physical infrastructure (office space) of the university, constituted inter alia institutional discrimination by gender.

The University has had 15 months to make plans and find solutions to the evolving challenges of the pandemic. Telling caregivers of dependent children or older adults to take vacation days or unpaid leave is not the solution.

We stand with our colleagues in Nursing and other departments and state clearly that the ‘status quo’ of working double-duty for the foreseeable future is not acceptable.  Changes are needed not only to tenure and promotion processes for those impacted by the pandemic,  but to immediate action that will alleviate the workload on these faculty and staff in recognition of their circumstance.

Respectfully for your consideration,

Members of the Department of Sociology and Criminology including:
Laura Funk, Professor
Mara Fridell, Assistant Professor Elizabeth Comack (Professor Emeritus) Annette Desmarais,
Professor
Gregg Olsen, Professor
Jeremy Patzer, Assistant Professor
David Camfield, Associate Professor
Katrin Roots, Assistant Professor Christopher Fries, Associate Professor Dan Albas, Professor
Rick Linden, Professor Andrew Woolford, Professor Karen Kampen, Instructor
Sonia Bookman, Associate Professor Jason Edgerton, Associate Professor Mark Hudson, Associate
Professor Lori Wilkinson, Professor
Susan Prentice, Professor

1 Langin, K. (2021). Pandemic hit academic mothers hard, data show. Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science), 371(6530), 660–660.https://doi.org/10.1126/science.371.6530.660

2 Abi Adams-Prassl, ‘The Gender Wage Gap on an Online Labour Market: The Cost of Interruptions’, cited in Alison Andrew et al. ‘The Gendered Division of Paid and Domestic Work under Lockdown’, IZA DP NO. 13500, July 20, http://ftp.iza.org/dp13500.pdf.


June 7, 2021

Dear University of Manitoba and Faculty of Education Administration: 
 
This open letter supports and reiterates the concerns expressed by colleagues in Nursing, Pharmacy, Rehabilitation Sciences, Community Health Sciences, Human Anatomy and Cell Science, Oral Biology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Physiology & Pathophysiology, and Dental Hygiene. As institutional and unit-level administrators, your immediate action is required to appropriately support faculty and staff experiencing unprecedented and unsustainable workload increases while overseeing full-time dependent care due to COVID.

The prior encouragement to treat this period of intense competing priorities and excess workload as a vacation, or to take unpaid leaves to cope with innumerable pressures, is inadequate, unhelpful, and merely exacerbates stress in all domains: physical, psychological, emotional, and financial.  Administration’s THRIVE wellness event demonstrates a similar apathy and disrespect. The invitation to attend plant care workshops hardly compensates for untenable working conditions imposed while employees simultaneously maneuver full-time dependent care. Actual solutions are needed, and these must be determined with our input as collegial governance requires.

The research around burnout and the deleterious impacts of COVID on the work productivity of parents and caregivers (especially women) has been aptly referenced by colleagues in the other open letters sent to university administration, and in workload research underway by a team of UM colleagues.  In short, the workload creep [1] that was evident pre-pandemic has morphed into a workload torrent during COVID. The burden on employees with dependent care responsibilities and the justification for urgent and substantive intervention on administration’s part have only increased with the government announcement that schools will remain closed for the remainder of the K-12 academic year.

Over the course of the pandemic, faculty have consistently demonstrated our commitment to students, colleagues, and the university in shifting rapidly and predominantly to online work. We have enacted creative and labour-intensive means to continue supporting anxious students and conducting research and service to the greatest extent possible, often at the expense of our own well-being. Our efforts have persisted despite the fact that in some units such as Education we have effectively been prohibited from accessing campus, with numerous specific directives to refrain from using offices and restrooms, in the course of carrying out our work. We also have numerous and substantial obligations to our families that currently are not being duly acknowledged or supported.

It behooves administration to change its present course and reciprocate our efforts in meaningful ways by demonstrating a robust commitment to faculty and staff so we can remain healthy and contributing members of this community in the long-term. Please promptly offer workload reduction, paid leaves, and any other supports deemed appropriate, to be determined in consultation with employees with dependent care duties.  
 
Sincerely, 

Clea Schmidt, UMFA Representative for Curriculum, Teaching and Learning (CTL)
Lilian Pozzer, UMFA Representative for CTL
Joe Curnow, UMFA Representative for Educational Administration, Foundations, and Psychology (EAFP)
Cameron Hauseman, UMFA Representative for EAFP
Sandie Kouritzin, Professor, CTL, and Principal Investigator, SSHRC-funded Study: Workload Creep in the U15 www.workloadcreep.ca.
Robert Mizzi, Canada Research Chair in Queer, Community, and Diversity Education
Joanna Black, Professor, CTL
Merli Tamtik, Associate Professor, EAFP
Peng Liu, Assistant Professor, EAFP
Ee-Seul Yoon, Associate Professor, EAFP
Charlotte Enns, Professor, EAFP

Sent via e-mail to:

Michael Bennaroch, UM President
Naomi Andrew, UM VP, Administration
Thomas Falkenberg, Acting Dean, Education
Karen Ragoonaden, Incoming Dean, Education
Frank Deer, Incoming Associate Dean, Education
Melanie Janzen, Incoming Associate Dean, Education
Martha Koch, Incoming Associate Dean, Education

[1] Kouritzin, S. (2019). Extent and consequences of faculty members’ workload creep in three Canadian faculties of education. Canadian Journal of Education, 42(4), 1092-1120.


Michael Benarroch, President and Vice-Chancellor
Naomi Andrew, Vice-President (Administration)
University of Manitoba
66 Chancellors Circle
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2

Dear President Benarroch and Vice-President Andrew,

We write to you today to express our concern about the insufficient support and accommodation provided to parents and others dealing with dependent care responsibilities during the COVID pandemic. While the past 15 months have been challenging for all members of our university community, parents and caregivers have been struck particularly hard.

At the Asper School of Business, many parents of young children have found themselves working double days trying to balance parenting children at home due to remote learning in schools or daycare closures with their normal teaching, research, and service duties to the university.

More than a year into the pandemic, this balancing act is coming apart. Faculty members in our department describe having to pull back from their research projects entirely. Some are exiting administrative roles or using leaves intended to foster research simply to manage the burden of pandemic dependent care. Faculty members are pausing their research agendas. They are
declining important service roles. And still, parents and other caregivers are dealing with unmanageable levels of stress and strain.

The fixes that faculty have found are not sustainable, nor are they just. Some have spent substantial sums to pay for private babysitting, tutoring, and other forms of dependent care. One faculty member’s spouse had to resign from her job in order to handle the pandemic dependent care burden.

The lack of support for parents and caregivers is eroding our morale of our faculty, deteriorating our mental health and the quality of our relationships, and impeding our ability to work toward the university’s strategic goals through our research, teaching, and service.

Even if rising vaccinations yield a resumption of daycares, summer camps, and other services this summer, the damage has been done: Research agendas have slowed, grantwriting opportunities have been missed, publication pipelines have been paused, and careers have been set back substantially. The effects of this will outlast the pandemic, and be seen in slowed career progress, salary progression, and timelines to promotion.

The response of the university so far -- suggesting that parents use vacation days, unpaid leave, or try and arrange one-off accommodations with their supervisors -- does not rise to the level of the challenge faced.

We call on the university to act quickly and decisively to provide immediate resources and accommodations for parents and caregivers. These should include the option of paid full or partial dependent care leaves for those who need it, and financial support for parents and caregivers continuing in their roles while managing dependent care with schools closed. It
should include more substantive measures (beyond the single tenure clock extension announced in the early days of the pandemic) to address and remedy the uneven and unjust effects of dependent care on faculty members’ productivity and career progress, both in the immediate and longer terms.

The President has thanked faculty for their “continued dedication and perseverance.” But these words must be paired with meaningful, concrete, and sustained action for the parents and caregivers who have faced the most significant burdens.

Respectfully yours,
Sean Buchanan
Victor Cui
Yuvraj Gajpal
Jijun Gao
Nathan Greidanus
Junyon Im
Lei Lu
Luming Wang
Wenlong Yuan
Ying Zhang

Asper School of Business
University of Manitoba


June 23, 2021 

TO: 

Dr. Michael Benarroch, President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Manitoba
Dr. Jeffery Taylor, Dean of Arts

Dear Dr. Benarroch and Dr. Taylor,

As of May 12, 2021, all schools in Winnipeg were closed to help contain the latest surge of Covid-19. The school closure order has now been extended to the end of the school year. This third wave of the pandemic has also shut down a significant number of day programs and child daycares, and leaves the start of summer day camp programs in limbo. 

This open letter supports and reiterates the demands expressed by colleagues in Nursing, Pharmacy, Rehabilitation Sciences, Community Health Sciences, Human Anatomy and Cell Science, Oral Biology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Physiology & Pathophysiology, Dental Hygiene, and Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, to institute a paid leave and immediate stoppage or reduction of teaching, service, research, and academic duties for faculty and staff with significant dependent care responsibilities. The requirement to step away from work duties is not sick leave, and it is certainly not appropriate to classify it as a vacation.    

The prior encouragement to treat this period of intense competing priorities and excess workload as a vacation, or to take unpaid leaves to cope with innumerable pressures, is inadequate, unhelpful, and disrespectful, especially in light of the exemplary service our faculty has provided during this past year. Administration’s THRIVE wellness event demonstrates an attitude of condescending indifference. The invitation to attend mindfulness and plant care workshops merely adds insult to the untenable working conditions employees must try to manage while coping, often single-handedly, with full-time dependent care. The latest “initiative to thank us” from President Benarroch, a single day off in July to “recalibrate,” further evidences a profound misrecognition of the extent of the crisis that many faculty members are suffering through.  Actual solutions are needed, and these must be determined with our input as collegial governance requires. 

The research around burnout and the deleterious impacts of COVID on the work productivity of parents and caregivers (especially women) has been aptly referenced by colleagues in the other open letters sent to university administration, and in workload research underway by a team of UM colleagues.  In short, the workload creep [1] that was evident pre-pandemic has accelerated into a workload avalanche during COVID. The burden on employees with dependent care responsibilities and the justification for urgent and substantive intervention on administration’s part have only increased with the government announcement that schools will remain closed for the remainder of the K-12 academic year. 

Over the course of the pandemic, faculty have consistently demonstrated our commitment to students, colleagues, and the university in shifting rapidly and predominantly to online work. We have enacted creative and labour-intensive means to continue supporting anxious students and conducting research and service to the greatest extent possible, often at the expense of our own health and well-being. We have burnt ourselves out in service to our students and our university community, and we have been jarred into the devastating realization that this emergency demand on our professional selves is still not over. Emails of thanks, overproduced HR extravaganzas, and a single day off is not nearly enough to begin to assist faculty in need through this ongoing crisis.  

It is incumbent upon administration to change its present course and reciprocate our efforts in substantive, meaningful ways by demonstrating a robust commitment to faculty and staff so we can remain healthy and contributing members of this community in the long-term. Please promptly offer workload reduction, paid leaves, and any other supports deemed appropriate, to be determined in consultation with employees with dependent care duties.  
 
Sincerely, 
Dr. Mark Libin
Dr. Alison Calder
Dr. Katrina Dunn
Dr. Vanessa Warne
Dr. Warren Cariou
Dr. Judith Owens
Dr. Lucas Tromly
Dr. Erin Keating
Dr. Pam Perkins
Dr. William Kerr
Dr. Serenity Joo
Dr. George Toles
Dr. Brenda Austin-Smith
Dr. Dana Medoro
Dr. Fernando de Toro
Dr. Margaret Groome
Dr. David Annandale
Dr. David Watt
Dr Glenn Clark
Dr. Jonah Corne

English, Theatre, Film & Media 

UMFA STRIKE VOTE 2021 INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS

PDF version here.

Everyone’s talking about my professors, instructors, librarians discussing a strike. Is this true? How likely is a strike? 

UMFA is committed to reaching a fair deal with administration at the bargaining table.  We intend to give negotiations every possible chance to succeed in order to avoid a strike. 

The strike vote is taking place October 16-18.  A ‘yes’ vote doesn’t necessarily mean that there will be a strike.  Professors, instructors, and librarians will only go on strike if negotiations fail.  We hope that a “yes” vote will motivate the administration to reach a fair settlement before the strike deadline.  

In its 50 years, UMFA has only gone on strike three times (1995, 2001, and 2016). More commonly, negotiations occur up to the last minute of a strike deadline. It’s nerve-wracking, but it’s often how bargaining plays out. Faculty will only go on strike if negotiations fail. 

What are the issues? 

The current round of bargaining involves many issues including equity, diversity and inclusion, childcare, intellectual property, and more. The most important issue is salary.  UMFA salaries have been frozen since 2016, as part of an austerity agenda embodied in the still-unproclaimed Public Services Sustainability Act (PSSA), which was used to freeze salaries in the public sector. While the legislation was used to justify freezes for UMFA members, other public-sector workers, like Nurses and Hydro workers, were able to achieve settlements that were greater than those outlined in the PSSA. Even though the PSSA was declared constitutional in October 2021, the Manitoba Court of Appeal upheld the lower court’s finding that the government acted unlawfully in its interventions in bargaining at the University it 2016. However, the university has yet to compensate UMFA members for wage increases that were unlawfully removed from the bargaining table.

President Michael Benarroch has indicated that our salaries have fallen behind by 8% compared to inflation alone, yet he also admitted that the government has once again instructed him to offer salary increases that mimic the PSSA. The government should not be involved in our bargaining! 

Why are you thinking of striking during the COVID-19 pandemic?

No one wants a strike. Last year alone, the UofM posted a $94 Million surplus, while your tuition went up, and our salaries remained frozen. We think the university can make student education a higher budgetary priority - and that includes ensuring that we can recruit and retain UMFA faculty members.  We want to ensure students remain a priority at the U of M and get the best education possible.  

How can you say it’s about the students when you’re just fighting for higher pay?

Of the 15 research intensive universities in Canada, U of M ranks at the bottom in terms of salaries. That means it is increasingly difficult to hire new faculty because job candidates are accepting offers that offer better pay elsewhere. New and established faculty are leaving the U of M for jobs in other provinces because the pay is better.  
 
What this means for students is that finishing your degree could take longer if departments don’t have enough faculty to offer requisite courses every year. It could mean your advisors have less time for you, or fewer research opportunities, if there are fewer faculty in their department. We want to ensure the U of M remains a university you are proud to attend, and that offers you a world-class education.

Why is the strike vote in the middle of term? Are we going to lose this term if there’s a strike?

Our Bargaining Team has been meeting with Administration twice a week since the start of term, and will continue to offer to meet, in the hopes of settling an Agreement at the bargaining table.  We don’t have an Agreement yet because the university insists they can’t afford to offer us a reasonable pay raise. 

What will a strike mean to me? What can I expect?

If a strike is called, UMFA members will not be teaching, supervising, or doing any committee work while the strike lasts. They won’t be grading papers or submitting grades. They won’t be answering emails from students or using UMLearn. There will be pickets that are carefully organized to adhere to safety and public health measures.  

How can I show my support for UMFA?  

We appreciate all messages of support we are receiving from students and staff. You can share your message of support by emailing UMFA at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can find us on Facebook and Twitter and can help share our messages there. Other opportunities to show support will be shared on these social media channels. 

You can call (204-474-9345) or email the University of Manitoba’s President, Dr. Michael Benarroch at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and ask that he take every possible step to prevent the strike by negotiating a fair agreement.  
 
You can ask your program’s Student Association to pass a motion expressing support for UMFA, and have them send it to us and President Benarroch.  You can also join the newly formed ‘Students Supporting UMFA’ on Instagram, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can speak to your UMSU or UMGSA representatives and ask them to pass a motion in support of our demands. The more voices the administration hears, the more likely they are to listen!

During the pandemic Professors, Instructors, Librarians and Archivists at the UM are burning the candle at both ends, working even more hours than before to provide quality remote education. At the same time, we’re homeschooling our own children, being caregivers for vulnerable dependents, trying to transform our homes into offices, and battling the isolation and anxiety. It’s hard work, but we do it because we love it.  

We're some of the best researchers and educators in the country, making sure Manitobans and those who come to the UM from outside the province get the experience they need and deserve. The UM is a member of the U15 – a group of research-intensive universities from across the country. While our work is stellar, our compensation is not – we have a hard time attracting and retaining new talent because our salaries are some of the lowest in the U15. This hurts the quality of education we provide, and it will get worse if we don’t reverse the current trend.

Collective bargaining is one of the most important way we advance our shared goals. Below are some brief explanations of how we do it.

A Brief on Process

Typically, the process begins as soon as a Collective Agreement (CA) is signed: UMFA Staff and Grievance Officers keep track of various issues that arise as the new Agreement is put to use. These issues, along with those raised at constituency meetings, are discussed by the Collective Agreement Committee (CAC). The CAC combines all this information with data gathered through a bargaining survey to create bargaining proposals. Those proposals are then debated by the Board of Representatives, which recommends the proposals to Members, who further debate them at a General Meeting.

With proposals discussed and approved, the Bargaining Team then presents them to the Employer. The Employer also presents their proposals. As negotiations unfold, the Bargaining Team (BT) reports back to the CAC, which debates possible changes to proposals and gives the BT direction on what to communicate to the Employer.

Depending on what happens at the bargaining table, the Executive organizes further constituency meetings, General Meetings, a strike vote, and marches, rallies, and other actions that support the Bargaining Team in their efforts. Once a tentative agreement is reached, the Executive also organizes a ratification vote. If Members think the deal is acceptable, a ‘yes’ vote turns the tentative deal into a new Collective Agreement.

Bargaining process flow chart

Who Runs the Process?

Bargaining is nothing if not a collective effort. The Bargaining Team (BT) is one of the most visible bodies that partakes in the bargaining process, and is made up of a Chief Negotiator, a number of Members (five this time), each appointed by UMFA’s Board of Representatives. UMFA’s legal staff are also on the BT. The Bargaining Team presents proposals to the Employer and reports to the Collective Agreement Committee on the day-to-day goings-on of bargaining.

While the Collective Agreement Committee (CAC) isn’t as visible as the Executive Council or the Bargaining Team, it plays an important role in the process: Composed of the Executive, the BT, and other UMFA Members appointed by the Board of Representatives, it solicits information from Members, formulates proposals, and develops bargaining strategy. Staff’s expertise and advice are also sought. The Bargaining Team reports back to the CAC regularly during bargaining, and the CAC modifies proposals and strategy as negotiations develop.

During, and even before, bargaining, The Executive Council (Exec) is responsible for developing timelines and ensuring that they’re met, preparing and releasing communications to the Membership and the media (with the help of staff and the Communications Committee), liaising with other unions and the labour movement, and anything else that needs to be done. It’s composed of a President and Vice President elected by the UMFA Membership, the immediate Past President, and five to seven Members appointed by the Board of Reps on the recommendation of the President.

UMFA’s Board of Representatives (the Board, or BoR) is made up of elected representatives from all over the UM. They are responsible for organizing constituency meetings and communicating with their colleagues about bargaining and sharing that information with the Board and the Executive. Board reps are an important link between the BT, Exec, the CAC, and the Membership as a whole, and have a hand in mobilization, among other things.

However, the highest decision making body at UMFA is a General Meeting, constituted when all Members of UMFA are called to discuss specific topics. In the context of collective bargaining, Special General Meetings (SGMs) are called to discuss proposals, overall strategy, and strike votes. It’s also at a Special General Meeting that a tentative deal is discussed, and a ratification vote taken.

Together, these various bodies make the bargaining process what it is: a dialogue between Members about what the workplace should look like and how to make it a reality.

We Make U of M Happen!